NC State University Soil Physical Properties Laboratory
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ENVIRONMENTAL AND AGRICULTURAL TESTING SERVICE
SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Department of Soil Science
1325 Williams Hall
Campus Box 7619
100 Derieux Street
Raleigh, NC 27695-7619

Fax: 919-515-2167

Dr Michael Vepraskas, Science Advisor
919-515-1458
Michael_Vepraskas@ncsu.edu 

Chris Niewoehner, Lab Manager
3413 Williams Hall
919-515-1459
Chris_Niewoehner@ncsu.edu


Purpose

The Soil Physical Properties Laboratory analyzes samples for research projects from North Carolina State University,as well as from projects at other universities,the private sector,and governmental agencies.

The Laboratory is designed to perform Particle Size Analysis and Soil Water Retention Analysis.

Particle Size is determined by the Hydrometer Method.

Soil Water Retention Analysis can be run for pressures ranging from -0.3 to -15 bars for disturbed samples,and from 0 to -0.3 bars for intact cores.

 

Sample Submittal

All analyses are requested using an Analysis Request Form available at: Download

Contact the laboratory manager or supervisor to discuss the nature of your request before submitting an Analysis Request Form.

Analysis and laboratory use is on a first come first-serve basis.

 

Charges for Soil Analysis

Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

  • Cost per sample $26.47

Particle Size Analysis by Hydrometer Method

  • Cost per sample $10.55

Soil Water Retention Analysis

  • Water Retention (Low Pressure) - $28.65 per sample
  • Water Retention (High Pressure) - $28.26 per sample

Soils High in Organic Matter

  • If the organic matter (OM) content of the soil is greater than 2%, removal of OM before particle size analysis should be considered.
  • OM removal using H202 is available for an additional charge.

Ion Chromatography System

Acknowledgement Statement for User Publications
Publications that include results obtained at the Environmental and Agricultural Testing Service laboratory should acknowledge our service center with the following statement:
This work was performed in part at the Environmental and Agricultural Testing Service Laboratory (EATS), Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, at North Carolina State University.


webmaster@www.soil.ncsu.edu Friday, July 25, 2014